Math


FREE DOWNLOAD: First-Lessons in Arithmetic, Jones Bros., 1878. This math book will provide home school parents and public school teachers a incomparable tool from the past to help their students master the fundamentals of arithmetic. This book was handed down to me by my family. My ancestors used it. It is my privilege to make this precious family heirloom available to the public. My main purpose in publishing this book on the web is not just antiquarian, I fully expect that parents and teachers will download this book and use it to produce a generation of children who are experts at basic math calculation. Personally, I think it is far better than Ray's Arithmetic, and vastly superior to the confusing modern consumable workbook that plagues today's classrooms.  The final pages were scanned and published here on 10/3/04 (Revised 3/25/05) NOTE: It is a very large file (209.66.23 MB). Because the file is so large, I have divided it into 10 smaller files for easier downloading. 

1. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 1-31, Lessons 1-18. Counting & Addition.

2. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 32-50, Lessons 19-30. Addition & Subtraction.

3. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 51-71, Lessons 31-42. Multiplication

4. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 72-92, Lessons 43-54. Division.

5. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 93-104, Lessons 55-63. Fractions.

6. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 105-112, Lessons 64-67. Fractions continued, Notation & Numeration. 

7. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 113-121, Lessons 68-71. Addition & Subtraction. 

8. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 122-127, Lessons 72-73. Long Multiplication. 

9. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 128-133, Lessons 74-76. Long Division. 

10. First-Lessons in Arithmetic: Pages 134-144, Lessons 77-85. Money, etc. 

Here is First-Lessons in Arithmetic. Here I have combined all the pages above for teachers and parents who would like to download the entire document onto their computers. 

I appreciate a homeschool mom in Australia who sent me the following link to First Lessons in Numbers, (1888) This book is a real gem and quite similar to First-Lessons in Arithmetic.

First Book in Arithmetic is a wonderful supplement to First Lessons in Arithmetic.

Ray's New Intellectual Arithmetic was quite successful. This edition was published in 1877.

David Tower's 1850 Gradual Lessons in Oral and Written Arithmetic 

S. W. Baird 1897 Graded Work in Arithmetic: Numbers 1 to 20. Perhaps the best beginning book on arithmetic that I have seen. On January 21, 2010 a lady sent me an e-mail that she has been teaching it to her kindergarten daughter. She is amazed at how well the girl is able to solve complex problems. I hope to republish Baird's work in hardback for wider distribution. Here is Graded Work in Arithmetic Second Year, Numbers to 100. And Graded Work in Arithmetic: Numbers to 1,000,000.

George Albert Wentworth (1893) An Elementary Arithmetic. Somewhat similar to Baird's work. A very excellent beginning approach to arithmetic. I hope modern curriculum designers will take note and follow Wentworth's lead. Put a book like this in every classroom in America and you will see our country surge ahead of the rest of the world in this field. 

First Book in Arithmetic (1899) by Frederick Wiemer. Similar to Baird. 

First Steps Among Figures: A Drill Book in Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic (1878) by Levi N. Beebe. A very valuable and unique approach to teaching arithmetic facts to automaticity. More information on the Grube method is available in Grube's Method of Teaching Arithmetic (1891) by Levi Seeley. Students of the history of the teaching of arithmetic will enjoy reading, The Falsity of the Grube Method of Teaching Primary Arithmetic (1895) by Saul Baldness. 

The Franklin Primary Arithmetic Book (1879) by Edwin P. Seaver & George A. Walton. A worthy book to consider. Franklin Second Book of Arithmetic

How to Teach Arithmetic: A Manual for Teachers and a Textbook for Normal School (1914). This is a major reference book.  

Caution:  Be sure to show students the side of the math flashcards with the answers on them because if you show them the side without the answer they might memorize the side without the answer. Think about that. It is more important that you might think. We want students to associate two numbers in an addition problem with the correct answer not with a blank space.    

Learn addition and subtraction with Interactive Dominoes

FlashMaster

: Elizabeth Brown recommend FlashMaster to me. She says her daughter is doing great with it. 

Math with Larry: An excellent Math site. 

For a program that teaches basic math facts to automaticity, buy UberSmart Math Facts. This is very similar to Blumenfeld's program mentioned below. 

I heartily recommend Sam Blumenfeld's How to Tutor as an excellent source for a basic understanding of how to teach arithmetic. You can purchase his book at:  How to Tutor His method may seem a little strange to teachers used to modern textbooks, but a close reading will yield profound insights into best procedures for helping students master the fundamental arithmetical operations. Arithmetic operations should be memorized and over-learned to the point that they become automated procedural processes, fully automated and perfectly accurate. Unit counting should be avoided at all costs. Students who have the mechanics of calculation automated (able to run with out conscious attention) will inevitably be able to allocate more attention to problem solving. My gandson, Rhyan (age 9), studied Saxon Math at the Odessa Christian School where he learned all of his math facts to full automaticity.

Here is a link to a most unusual arithmetic book, but one which may hold great promise as a tool for teaching basic calculating skills.The arithmetical primer. Underhill's new table-book; or, Tables of arithmetic made easier. By D. C. Underhill ...Underhill, D. C. (Daniel C.), New ed., rev., enl., and improved.:  36 p. illus. 15 cm. New York, R. Marsh [c1854]  calculating skills: Arithmetical primer. 


Hall's Arithmetic Primer (1901). A marvelous method that every teacher and home school parent should have. You can download it from this URL at Google Book. Hall also wrote an Arithmetic Reader. which something of a combined reader and arithmetic book. Here is Adam's New Arithmetic (1848). Here is the Teacher's Key to Adam's New Arithmetic

Practical Arithmetic (1847) by James Thompson. 

The Stone-Millis Arithmetics: Primary (1914). Important for practical and theoretical purposes.

Here is a new site I recently found: Systematic Math. It will open your eyes.

Mental Arithmetic  (1851) by Benjamin Greenleaf. 

Mental Arithmetic  (1896) by George Hull. 

 Math Mammoth  has a lot of wonderful information on learning the arithmetic tables.

The First Steps in Numbers (1892) by Wenthwort and Reed. Of fundamental importance. Also Elementary Arithmetic (1901) by the same authors. Here is Wentworth's Primary Arithmetic (1890). 

Elementary (1921) The Alexander-Dewey Arithmetic

 Figures Made Easy: A First Arithmetic Book  Answer Key. Notable for its math tables. Learn these tables and will quickly become a master at arithmetic. 

The Society for Quality Education has published some great free math worksheets. 

Honeycomb Multiplication Game. This is a fun game for learning the multiplication tables. 


Why Your Child Can't Understand Math

My search of good math material has been most frustrating. I have never felt that the typical math adoptions were effective, but  was at a lost as to how to improve things. Recently I have come upon a very perceptive article by Jerry Schnell which sheds much light upon this universal problem. Jerry Schnell's website is no longer on the Internet. I was fortunate to keep a copy of the his article, Why Your Child Can't Understand Math. I will publishing more of his materials on math on this page in the near future. Jerry stopped by my school for a short several years ago. His daughter contacted me last year to tell me that he had passed away. 

 Multiplication Matrix

My good friend, Charlie Richardson, recently sent me a Multiplication Matrix that he and his wife developed to help students learn their multiplication table. He has given me permission to publish it here. The Matrix should prove very valuable in math classes around the world. Here is is in Adobe format: Multiplication Matrix. Mr. Richardson passed away a few years ago. How time flies! 

AAA Math - Interactive Math Skills Site

Recently I came across a very useful, interactive math site: AAA Math. I highly recommend that parent and teachers direct their students to this site to help improve their calculation skills.

Teaching Tables

Recently I happened upon a very helpful interactive math site for learning the times tables. The program is available  for purchase, but there is a fully functional version on-line: TeachingTables.com.

Saxon Math Warrior

. A new website promoting the methodology of John Saxon. 

Free Math Help. This is one of the best sites for algebra and up. 

Math-U-See

has a lot of good information. 

Here is Art Reed's book on Using John Saxon's Math Books. 

During my years in public education, I knew a lot of experienced teachers who believe that Excel Math was the best k-6 Curriculum ever written. I was pleased to discover recently that the company is still in business. Visit them at Excel Math

Stern Math by Catherine Stern. This is an approach worth investigating. 


Rocket Math

: A great way to learn the math facts. 


Algebra - All the help you need - FOR FREE!

A high school student recently told me that he had improved his Algebra grades by studying the information on the Purplemaths web site. A brief visit to the sight makes it obvious that this is a true national educational treasure. Here is almost everything you need to know about Algebra. Click here: purplemaths.

For advanced studies in math, you will find www.cramster.com a very hepful source.

The unusual title of this valuable essay says a lot: In Defense of "Mindless Rote." Ethan Akin make a strong defense of the importance of learning lthe basics to automaticity. Here are some other excellent articles on the need for "overlearning" of basic skills: "Practice Makes Perfect: But Only If You Practice It Beyond the Point of Perfection."

Here is a mind boggling video on How Not to Teach Math. 

I have heard that Singapore Math is very good. Here is an explanatory video.  Introduction to Singapore Math. 

Calculus Made Easy: Being a Very-Simplest Introduction to Those Beautiful Method of  Reckoning which are Generally Called by the Terrifying Names of: Differential Calculus and the Integral Calculus (1914) by Silvanus Phillips Thompson.